Standardized Infection Ratios

What is the standardized infection ratio?

The standardized infection ratio (SIR) is our actual number of infections divided by our expected number of infections.  Anything above 1.0 would be “more than expected” and anything below would be “less than expected”.

A SIR of 0.40 for instance could mean you are actually 60% less likely to obtain an infection at that facility.

Foot Notes:
SIR Infection data is Fiscal Year 2017 though January
SSI is for NHSN/CDC Defined Procedures

 

Quality Measure

What is this and why is it important?

Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI)
  • A central line is a narrow tube inserted by a doctor into a large vein of a patient's neck or chest to give important medical treatment. When not put in correctly or kept clean, central lines can become an easy way for germs to enter the body and cause serious infections in the blood. These infections are called central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), and they can be deadly. CLABSIs are mostly preventable when healthcare providers use infection prevention steps recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
  • This measure compares the number of central line-associated bloodstream infections in a hospital’s intensive care unit to a national benchmark

Lower numbers are better. A score of zero (0)—meaning no CLABSIs—is best.

Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI)
  • A catheter is a drainage tube that is inserted by a doctor into a patient’s urinary bladder through the urethra and is left in place to collect urine while a patient is immobile or incontinent. When not put in correctly or kept clean, or if left in place for long periods of time, catheters can become an easy way for germs to enter the body and cause serious infections in the urinary tract. These infections are called catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), and they can cause additional illness or be deadly. CAUTIs are mostly preventable when healthcare providers use infection prevention steps recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • This measure compares the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in a hospital’s intensive care unit to a national benchmark.

Lower numbers are better. A score of zero (0)—meaning no CAUTIs—is best.

Surgical Site Infection (SSI) from colon surgery or abdominal hysterectomy
  • A surgical operative procedure is one that is performed on a patient in an operating room where a surgeon makes at least one incision through the skin or mucous membrane to give important medical treatment. When not conducted in a sterile environment and following sterile procedures, a surgical site can become an easy way for germs to enter the body and cause serious infections in a patient, which can affect the skin, tissues under the skin, organs, or implanted material. These infections are called Surgical Site Infections (SSIs), and they can be deadly. SSIs are mostly preventable when healthcare providers use infection prevention steps recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
  • This measure compares the number of surgical site infections from specific types of operative procedures conducted at a hospital to a national benchmark.

Lower numbers are better. A score of zero (0)—meaning no SSIs—is best.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) Blood Laboratory-identified Events (Bloodstream infections)
  • Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is a type of bacteria that is resistant to certain antibiotics. MRSA infections in the bloodstream can be acquired in hospital settings, and may cause severe or life-threatening symptoms.
  • Hospital staff can prevent MRSA from being transmitted to patients by taking certain precautions, such as washing hands; using protective gloves and gowns; sterilizing equipment between patients; covering the mouth, nose, and eyes when appropriate; and practicing responsible use of antibiotics. Responsible use of antibiotics includes limiting the dosage to only what is needed to combat the infection, and avoiding the use of more powerful antibiotics when a narrow-spectrum antibiotic will work.
  • Symptoms from MRSA infections often take a few days to develop. Patients are tested for MRSA bloodstream infections if they show signs of illness while in the hospital. This measure compares the number of MRSA-positive blood specimens collected four or more days after the patient entered the hospital to a national benchmark.

Lower numbers are better. A score of zero (0)—meaning no MRSA Infections—is best.

Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) Laboratory-identified Events (Intestinal infections)
  • Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) is a type of bacteria that causes inflammation of the colon. C. diff. infection can cause severe diarrhea, fever, appetite loss, nausea, and abdominal pain.
  • Hospital staff can prevent C. diff. from being transmitted to patients by taking certain precautions, such as washing hands; using protective gloves and gowns; practicing responsible use of antibiotics; and sterilizing equipment between patients. Responsible use of antibiotics includes limiting the dosage and length of treatment to only what is needed to successfully combat the infection, and avoiding the use of more powerful antibiotics when a narrow-spectrum antibiotic will work.
  • Symptoms from C. diff. infections often take a few days to develop. Patients are tested for C. diff. infections if they show signs of illness while in the hospital. This measure compares the number of stool specimens that tested positive for C. diff. toxin four or more days after the patient entered the hospital to a national benchmark.

Lower numbers are better. A score of zero (0)—meaning no C. Diff. Infections—is best.